Excel vba application screenupdating does not work plue size dating

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We use Excel as a tool for processing our applied data. You googled a lot and found a VBA macro that solves your task.However, your knowledge of VBA leaves much to be desired.In Excel 2010, you could control whether or not the screen updates while a macro is running by setting Application. In Excel 2013, screen updating cannot be controlled in this way.Screen updating is especially important for long-running macros (e.g.You may even find in some cases that Screen Updating is set back to true before your recorded macro completes.This can happen with recorded macros that have the word Select used frequently.If this does happen, you may need to repeat the line: Application.Article contributed by Daryl Lucas Many people know they can speed execution of Word Automation by turning off screen updating: Word. Screen Updating = False Many do not know, however, that they can get an even greater speed boost by hiding the application altogether.

So, we may not know all specificities of calling this or that option, and we cannot tell the difference between VBA execution speed in Excel 20.

Here is an example from a Visual Basic client: In the above example, Word launches but does not appear anywhere on the screen. (It does, though, show up in NT's Task Manager, in its list of running processes.) Despite this apparent lack of response, Word is very active and quite capable of doing everything it is told-creating a new document, inserting the message, , saving the file, closing it, and quitting.

You can verify this by launching Word the old-fashioned way and opening File1 at the bottom of the File menu after running the sample code.

If this sounds like you, then Public Sub Add Content To Sheet() Dim start Time As Double start Time = Timer Dim r As Excel. Range("A1: P30") Dim i As Long Dim repeat As Long Dim cell As Excel. Try this out: shrink your Excel workbook window to a smaller size and run the code again. Screen Updating = False Dim start Time As Double start Time = Timer Dim r As Excel. Range("A1: P30") Dim i As Long Dim repeat As Long Dim cell As Excel.

Range For repeat = 1 To 30 For Each cell In r cell. Value Mod 2 = 0) Then ' if i is even, color the cell white cell. Range For repeat = 1 To 30 For Each cell In r cell. Value Mod 2 = 0) Then ' if i is even, color the cell white cell.

Press , then click the "No" button in the "The following features cannot be saved in macro-free workbook" warning dialog. Choose "Excel macro-enabled workbook" from the "Save as type" drop-down list and click the Save button.

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